TSCA delivery — EPA is likely to set use restrictions or require exposure controls for users of chemicals.

TSCA delivery — EPA is likely to set use restrictions or require exposure controls for users of chemicals.

It is not known how EPA will approach styrene health effects data in the next stage of its work plan chemicals program, or whether assessment under TSCA will be coordinated with the ongoing IRIS review. In 2011, following a flawed review using cherry-picked data, the National Toxicology Program listed styrene as a “reasonably anticipated carcinogen” in its Report on Carcinogens.

Under its existing default policy, EPA would likely list styrene in its IRIS database as a “probable carcinogen” based on studies showing mouse lung tumors following styrene exposure. The styrene industry group SIRC is working with the IRIS program to encourage consideration of data on mode of action (biological mechanisms leading to tumors) when determining the relevance of animal tumors to human risk assessment.

Because of ACMA’s advocacy and technical programs, the composites industry is well positioned to work with EPA and Congress on TSCA reform and on TSCA reviews of styrene and other chemicals.

ACMA and TSCA

  • ACMA worked with EPA to develop MACT control requirements that reduce plant emissions.
  • The UEF emission factors developed by ACMA promote the use of effective pollution prevention technologies.
  • ACMA has long encouraged industry business owners and plant managers to consider the up-to-date toxicity research in setting their own workplace exposure targets.
  • Staff and ACMA members work continually to build effective relationships with congressional offices, including with key members of the House and Senate committees with responsibility for EPA’s TSCA program.