Travelers arriving and departing from the new bus transit center at Union Station in Washington, D.C., have no trouble locating the small information and shopping pavilion built to serve them. With its bright yellow walls, curving silver roof and double-ovoid shape, the FRP building, constructed by Compmillennia LLC of Washington, N.C., stands out from the surrounding concrete structures.

The District of Columbia decided in 2012 to consolidate the regional bus stops scattered throughout the city at the Beaux Arts-style Union Station. The space chosen for the bus transit center was a concrete slab that served as the parking lot entrance and walkway between the station and H Street. Studio Twenty Seven Architecture was tasked with transforming the space under a fast-track project with a modest budget and an eight-month schedule.

Workers at Compmillennia apply a coat of polyester resin with fillers to FRP wall panels.

Workers at Compmillennia apply a coat of polyester resin with fillers to FRP wall panels.

The firm based its design upon the metaphor of a Zen rock garden. The information and shopping pavilion – or infoshop – is reminiscent of rocks in a field. A wood and glass enclosure, suggesting a meditation porch, serves as a waiting area. There is also a restroom pavilion made with a recycled shipping container armature.