Also patented is the design of the transom and associated triangular torsional bracing that addresses the need to absorb engine thrust. “The thrust created by the motor has to have an opposing force, but the transom alone will not do it,” says Graham. “By including composite-based poles to reinforce the transom, the thrust dissipates through the poles onto the captain’s seat and then onto the hull side panels, creating a triangular structure.” The boat’s transom and hinge are just two of several mature patents and patents pending in Australia, New Zealand, North America and Europe.

The GFRP boat features 11 pieces, which snap together when users are ready to hit the water.

The GFRP boat features 11 pieces, which snap together when users are ready to hit the water.

As of mid-March, Quickboats had sold close to 450 foldable boats. The vast majority were for adventure watercraft, with a few used as tenders for sailboats. The company partners with distributors in Taiwan and are currently in discussions with other groups for distribution to North Asia, the Americas and Europe.

Quickboats also has had inquiries from government and military organizations that see the foldable boat as a potential first response emergency water vehicle for inundated flood rescue and rescues in hard-to-access dams or canyons. “You can put 30 Quickboats in a 40-foot container complete with engines and safety gear and send it into a disaster area where, in the past, one or two boats at a time have been deployed,” says Graham. “Frequently, inflatables have been used in these situations but they pose the risk of puncture, particularly where there has been destruction. Rescue is a completely different application than the adventure market, but we are more than willing to serve it.”