As the only company in the world that has built an operational Hyperloop system, Hyperloop One continues to make history with the successful completion of its second phase of testing. The news comes just a few weeks after Hyperloop One announced its first successful full systems test in a vacuum environment.

On July 29, 2017, Hyperloop One completed Phase 2, achieving historic test speeds traveling nearly the full distance of the 500-meter DevLoop track in the Nevada desert. The Hyperloop One XP-1, the company’s first-generation pod, accelerated for 300 meters and glided above the track using magnetic levitation before braking and coming to a gradual stop.

With Hyperloop One, passengers and cargo are loaded into a pod, and accelerate gradually via electric propulsion through a low-pressure tube. The pod quickly lifts above the track using magnetic levitation and glides at airline speeds for long distances due to ultra-low aerodynamic drag.

“We’ve proven that our technology works, and we’re now ready to enter into discussions with partners, customers and governments around the world about the full commercialization of our Hyperloop technology,” said Hyperloop One CEO Rob Lloyd. “We’re excited about the prospects and the reception we’ve received from governments around the world to help solve their mass transportation and infrastructure challenges.”

The pod is reportedly the only vehicle in the world that, with the company’s proprietary linear electric motor, achieves autonomous high-speed propulsion and levitation in a controlled low-pressure environment. Made of structural aluminum and a lightweight carbon fiber, the shell measures 28 feet long.

Other companies working on composite-intensive Hyperloop pods include Hyperloop Transportation Technologies (HTT), began construction of its first full-scale capsule in April. HTT’s capsule is made with a carbon fiber composite material, dubbed “Vibranium” after the fictional material used to protect Captain America. HTT collaborated with Slovakian materials firm c2i on the composite, which will cover the inside and outside of its capsules. Additionally, many students from all around the world are constructing pods with carbon fiber composites, including Netherlands-based TU-Delft, which won SpaceX’s first Hyperloop competition weekend.