best-practices-curing-composites

Getting the Proper Cure

Getting the proper cure for a composite application is important to meet performance requirements, such as longevity, corrosion and fatigue resistance, low odor and more. Simply put, curing refers to hardening...
john-tickle-bridge-ut-knoxville-pultrusion

Pultrusion Basics

The unique advantages of pultruded fiber reinforced polymer composites have enabled them to penetrate markets where other materials could not meet the design or end-use requirements efficiently. For...
3a-composites-baltek-sandwich-core-material

Selecting Sandwich Core Materials

When it comes to composites, you have probably heard this before: “There are so many factors that influence the selection of .” Some argue that selecting a sandwich core material is even more complex due...
Warped-panel-glass-fiber-reinforcement

Variations in Glass Fiber Reinforcements

In most composite applications, looks matter. One of the main factors affecting cosmetics is part shrinkage. Resin shrinks up to 8 percent as it cures, while glass reinforcement does not shrink at all. When...
gel-coat

Gel Coat Basics

Unsaturated polyester resins (UPR) were first developed in the late 1920s in the research group of Dr. Wallace Carothers at DuPont. In the late 1940s, coatings made from these resins were applied to molds to...
montage-of-fiberglass-products

A Primer on Glass Fiber Reinforcements

The Making of Glass Fiber Engineered minerals are melted in high-temperature, firebrick lined furnaces, refined to allow volatile materials to escape the “melt.” The melt flows out of the furnace...